Browsing posts in: Accessories shop

Honda Shadow Bags: Cleaning self help guide for Bikers

Owning a bike is one thing, but taking care of it and its accessories are a completely different matter altogether. Most bikers, including myself, are of the opinion that a bike reflects the true personality of its owner. This makes all the more important for a biker to keep his bike and its accessories like saddlebags, jackets, chaps, and boots, all at its absolute best. Saddlebags being an indispensable part of a bike must be given special attention when it comes to maintenance. You may ask, do I really think so? Yes absolutely, I own two of the best Honda Shadow Viking Saddlebags and I can tell you from experience that though they protect your belongings from dust and dirt, they need constant care and protection from the elements of nature.

 

The cleaning process

It’s quite easy to clean Honda Shadow bags, and with periodic care your bags too, like mine, would remain as good as new. One way of maintaining them is to use a quality leather cleaning agent. Remember, some of the chemicals used as cleaning agents may damage your precious bag, so it’s best to test before using them on your bags. The testing process is very simple; apply the cleaning agent on a small piece of leather, leave it to dry in a clean place. If the agent does not damage the leather, apply the same on your saddlebags. After sometime use a conditioner such as linseed oil on the bags. Do not forget, when applying the cleaning agent or the linseed oil, you need to apply it evenly. The best recourse is to use a clean sponge to apply these substances.

After treating the leather with cleaning agent and oil, taper off the cleaning process by polishing the leather saddlebag. It is best to use high quality polish. Your precious bag deserves the best, don’t you think so? Use the polish only on the leather, and keep it off the metal parts. Forces of nature like wind and dust can easily damage the polish, which you so fervently applied. This can be easily prevented by using moisture barrier. Lastly, don’t forget the golden rule, saddlebag cleaning is not a one time process, it’s something which must be done on a periodic basis.

The above given cleaning process is for bikers who want to take care of their bike accessories themselves. It is more of a Saddlebag cleaning self help guide for dummies. So, bikers who want perfection should seek help from experienced professionals.

About the author: Kevin Parker enjoys reading and writing about motorcycles, safety, motorcycle tours along with many other interesting daily topics at Viking bags. Furthermore Kevin Parker has been riding for over 8 years.


Mototent – a tent for your motorcycle adventure

As my friends know I’m not the kind of biker that sleeps in the wild during my tours. I’m more about having a nice bottle of French red wine and a huge steak while we chat and tell stories about our rides. But if I will ever want more wild adventure to my tours (what’s stopping me) and will need a tent, then, let it be a tent with style. That’s why when Loic from Lone Rider Moto sent me some pictures with their new Mototent I said to myself, that’s the way to do it. It even has enough space to protect your loved BMW from the weather (Honda’s don’t need this 🙂

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Here is how these guys came up with the idea: “The idea of the MOTOTENT appeared to its founders in 2009, during a trip on motorcycles from Beijing to Paris. When crossing Kazakhstan on bikes, the motorcyclists spent many nights in their tents. When settling the camp, it was imperative to hide the bikes, not to attract attention. Their tents were light but too small: their muddy clothes and belongings did not fit inside. They had to change their clothes outside of their tents. They also had to unload most of the bike’s bags, to hide the motorcycle inside the tent!
To overcome these problems they decided to build a made-to-measure tent, with enough space to both hide the bike and be able to comfortably change to dry, while standing.” – which I found quite cool. It’s always nice to see products born from the true experience of riders rather from a marketing department.

 


Romanian Motorcycle exhibition – SMAEB2011

This year Honda was completely missing from Smaeb, and KTM was also more or less missing. BMW had a huge display of bikes (all at un-reasonable prices) and Yamaha was quite ok as well and surprise, Harley was present as well. Still it felt more like an accessories show. This really makes me wonder, how do motorcycle dealers evaluate the importance of being displayed at an exhibition? If they don’t sell anything there, it means it’s money badly spent? I was under the impression that the affinity towards a brand is built in years, and you have to work towards it, even if there are no immediate rewards.

So this year I can’t dream about a new Honda because there weren’t any that I could see or test… Anyway, a few pictures. Babes come first:

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A bit of stunt show was going outside:

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I really liked the old bikes display:

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Sculpture from engine parts. Sweet.

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The BMW stand -sorry no close-ups – I couldn’t get any near to the price tag :)) :

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The Versys looks quite ok:

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2010 Yamaha Super TNR – I don’t know, it didn’t feel like much, compared with the older, sturdier Super TNR. Too much plastic and looks for Dakar if you ask me:

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Avatar:

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Vespas were cool. Too bad they are way to easy to steal:

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Well, not much to see, but at least it signals riding time has arrived!

 


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